I’m not going to putz around: adult euthanasia program

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Eu·tha·na·sia, euthanasia is the painless killing of a patient suffering from chronic unresolved and intolerable illness. People that know me very well probably knew that this post was coming for a very long time. I don’t believe in suicide.

I attempted suicide in 2004 and 2007.

Since then, all my near-death experiences have been from the mismanagement/overuse/overprescribed medication (intramuscular injection- IM) over ten years.  

The long-term impact on my body has been devastating for first-episode psychosis. In terms of the treatment of schizophrenia and over ten years stable, the impact on my metabolic rate has been staggering. I have gained over a hundred pounds.

The relationship with my IM has never been one of noncompliance. I was consistent for ten years on a 400 IM, then 300 IM dosage, when the issue with metabolizing my antipsychotic through an Injection started to speed up… 

Let me make that abundantly clear. Only lived experience tells me attempted suicide can be very painful and lead to even more chronic medical issues. No, I believe in state-assisted suicide or adult euthanasia. 

I don’t think the government should walk around and decide who dies and who lives–. Instead, while people retain mental capacity, I think they should make personal decisions around quality of life. I know from my own lived experience, and I’ve been in such pain and such confusion-such as extreme agitation that it would’ve been easier and less painful to let go and accept death. Resuscitation and CPR are even more confusing and disturbing for people in distress.

So when I think of Special Projects and enter into the conversation of end-of-life and transitional life care, this ethical dilemma is deferring the patient’s wish comes at the quality of life of the medical patient (or person intervented-tor-the person resurrected. My final solution in palliative decision-making and authority over the body is that: euthanasia.

WE need a government-sponsored adult euthanasia program. 

The reality is that by ignoring the enormity of the pain and agony and human suffering and make decisions that take away a person’s choice to move forward in their transition. Why not be humane in our deepest beliefs as in our government practices?

Termed the T-50: We need to devise policy after an open discussion around trauma-informed practices for deploying adult euthanasia in all 50 states. Either way, this entire conversation is too often avoided in mental health circles. You have to wonder, does everybody think their life is going to always go according to plan? For those who don’t, can we at least talk without shame and taboo smoke screens.

People think that they’re always going to be able to recover. It is a lot more complicated than that, though. When you’ve experienced contemplating this idea of the quality of life so often, you have a perfect view of what you demand from your reality or health

For example, further loss of airway restriction because of additional weight gain will have serious health ramifications to my preexisting conditions. In the event of x,y.z, I have several plans in place for my doctors for life preservation. Why shouldn’t the government only facilitate the transition process if we won’t ever recover? 

I have since switched to an oral delivery system, P/O, and Metformin to help with metabolism. If things move further in the wrong direction, I can see, very soon, my physiological situation to be seriously compromised. 

Living life at such an extremely unhealthy and likely not to improve state is my only option.

THEN Sign me out right now!

I’m not suggesting eliminating the medical industry from the dyeing process. I am also not suggesting removing ventured interests from investing in our program, operating its machinery, or labor force to keep it going.

We must regulate every industry involved in the final solution to maintain a standard operating apparatus. After all, if our own culture rejects or demands the strength to bring it into being. The plan at least needs to answer to regulation and other ethical and moral meters-sticks for professional conduct. 

 

About the Author

J. Peters

J. Peters is the Editor-in-Chief of Mental Health Affairs.

Award-winning book author and Bold 10 Under ten award recipient J. Peters, LCSW. Through his work as a Licensed Clinical Social Worker. Mental health therapist and disability rights advocate Mr. Peters fights for those without a voice in various care systems, such as the New York City Department of Social Services, the New York State Office of Mental Health, or the city's Department of Corrections.

Mr. Peter's battle with Schizophrenia began at New London University in his last semester of college. Discharged from Greater Liberty State Hospital Center in July 2008, Jacque's recovery was swift but not painless and indeed brutal after spending six months there.

He has published several journal articles on recovery and mental health and three books: University on Watch, Small Fingernails, and Wales High School. He is also a board member of the newspaper City Voices. Mr. Peters currently sits on the CAB committee (Consumer Advisory Board) for the Department of Mental Health and Hygiene in NYC and the Office of Mental Health (OMH) as a peer advocate.

Owner of Recovery Now in New York, a private psychotherapy practice, Mr. Peter's approach is rooted in a foundation of evidence-based practices (EBP). Jacques earned a master's degree in Social Work from Binghamton University and worked as a field instructor for master's and bachelor's level students in NYC.

He is blogging daily on his site mentalhealthaffairs.blog, Mr. Peters regularly writes articles relating to his lived experience with a mental health diagnosis.

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