SUBMISSIONS

Submit your work to our site

Submitting a Blog

We publish blogs that are relevant to our mission of serving as a journalistic forum for rethinking psychiatric care in the United States and abroad. We are looking for essays that are informative, thought-provoking, and clearly written. Ideally, blogs should be between 1,500 and 3,500 words. 

If you haven’t written for us before, you may query to see if the theme of your proposed blog would be of interest to us. Please send your query, or your blog submission, to the chief editor J. PETERS at email: maxwellguttman@gmail.com.

We publish edited copy. Our editorial staff will work with you on any revisions that we believe may help to create a clear, concise, and thematically tight piece.  

Not all blogs are accepted for publication at Mental Health Affairs. Reasons for this might include the quality of writing, the length, or that the story doesn’t ask us, in some way, to rethink psychiatry.

Submitting a Personal Story

Welcome! We appreciate your interest in submitting a personal story to Mental Health Affairs

A ‘personal story’ is defined as your story of being in relationship to psychiatry and/or the mental health system, whatever that means to you. It might involve your opinions and analysis of what happened to you, as well. It can be about a specific event, or about your overall journey, provided it fits the length requirements (1500 to 3000 words) and has a narrative arc. The piece should be about your personal experiences, not psychiatry or the mental health system in general. Submissions should fall under an intersection of mental health, treatment, systems, social work, psychiatry and peer work. We only publish original works not previously published elsewhere.

Not all personal stories are accepted for publication at Mental Health Affairs. Reasons for this might include the quality of writing, the length, or that the story doesn’t ask us, in some way, to rethink psychiatry. We are looking for stories that are clearly told, insightful, and in one way or another, speak to this theme of the societal need to rethink how mental health care is practiced.

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