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The Trilogy 📚3️⃣

The Trilogy 📚3️⃣

The time is upon us! I need to address the ongoing rumors circulating around my writing. Ever since I have announced a second novella, Small Fingernails, Even Less Love 💕 , there has been undeniable chatter in the literary world. Upon hearing the new novella was, in fact, the prequil to University on Watch👓, the chatter has increased exponentially. A litany of comments and all sorts of blog posts have been published calling upon me to answer the big question:

“Max, is this a Trilogy?”

So, I am here to answer the big question❗️

Yes!


“I learned from therapy a long time ago. Experience your emotions, my therapists have always said to me.  Don’t bottle up your feelings. On the walk up to the ER, even the drive the hospital itself, these words would hang over me, and remind me, gently, not too flood, but certainly, not to be afraid to tear up. I usually do, every so often, and I have never felt ashamed of doing just that. I have gone through so much during my recovery. Felt, experienced, and witnessed, so very much pain, triumph, and struggle to push past the obstacles I have faced that my controlled emotional experience on the walk to the ER was my badge of courage. Through all of this, I earned my badge, and I will never surrender it readily…” excerpt from The Revisionist 💉

That’s right. This book is the long standing response to requests that I finally write a novella about my recovery. THIS IS THAT STORY!

J. Peters

J. Peters

Max Guttman '08, MSW '12, is the owner of Recovery Now, a private mental health practice. Through his work as a Licensed Clinical Social Worker, therapist and disability rights advocate, Max fights for those without a voice in various New York City care systems. He received a 2020 Bearcats of the Last Decade 10 Under 10 award from the Binghamton University Alumni Association. Guttman treats clients with anxiety and depression, but specializes in issues related to psychosis or schizoaffective spectrum disorders. He frequently writes on his lived experiences with schizophrenia. "I knew my illness was so complex that I’d need a professional understanding of its treatment to gain any real momentum in recovery," Guttman says. "After undergraduate school and the onset of my illness, I evaluated different graduate programs that could serve as a career and mechanism to guide and direct my self-care. After experiencing the helping hand of my social worker and therapist right after my 'break,' I chose social work education because of its robust skill set and foundation of knowledge I needed to heal and help others." "In a world of increasing tragedy, we should help people learn from our lived experiences. My experience brings humility, authenticity and candidness to my practice. People genuinely appreciate candidness when it comes to their health and recovery. Humility provides space for mistakes and appraisal of progress. I thank my lived experience for contributing to a more egalitarian therapeutic experience for my clients."
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